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snow and believing




Okay, I am done with my whining and have overcome my momentary lapse of sanity and aversion to snow, so here are two snowy pictures taken this winter. The shoveling last night turned out to be not as bad as I thought - it only took an hour, it wasn't that cold and the sense of accomplishment at the end was quite euphoric.

Sometimes, as an "in the moment" type of person, I lose sight of the fact that things are in process and not everything that I am seeing and experiencing right now is the final product - tough times will pass, healing will come, and there is always hope that the end result will be much better than I can picture now. I have been having a discussion with God about certain things that I have been faithfully praying for that don't seem to get any better. I admit, recently there has been a tinge of disappointment in my attitude towards the Creator of all things which is the last thing I want. So this morning on my way to school, I was listening to a song as I drove over the bridge, trying to see my way throught the salt and snow spray of the semi-truck in front of me. Here it is:
I have to believe that He sees my darkness, I have to believe that He knows my pain.
I have to lift up my hands in worship, worship His name.
I have to declare that He is my refuge. I have to deny that I am alone.
I have to lift up my eyes to the mountains. It's where my help comes from.
He said that He's forever faithful. He said that He's forever true.
He said that He can move mountains and if He can move mountains, he can move my mountain, he can move your mountain too.
I have to stand tall when the wind blows me over.
I have to stand strong when I'm weak and afraid.
I have to grab hold, hold of the garments, garments of praise.
I have to sing praise when the hour is midnight.
He unlocks the chains that bind up my soul
My sin and my shame, He has forgiven and made me whole.
I have to believe.
- words by Rita Springer

This morning I said...that's it, I believe, it is a choice, and I believe. I will not have a faith so fickle that it cannot withstand some pressure or a little bit of waiting or some unfavourable circumstances. And this afternoon I got some good news regarding one situation that I had been praying about. Yep. I believe.

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