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why

We are doing a series on healing in our small group. Tonight we tackle the topic of "why?" Why are there destructive patterns in our lives, why do we sabotage the very processes that are meant to mature us? Why are we sick and poor and needy in the first place? An interesting theory is that if we never get to the "why?" we will never change, for we spend all our energy on managing the problem instead of eradicating the cause. We may be able to turn lemons into lemonade, but without uprooting the lemon tree from our garden, the fruit will always be with us. Yes, I know, we kind of like lemonade, but try to work with me on what the analogy is saying, people.

Yesterday, I was talking to a friend of mine about the legalisation of prostitution in Amsterdam. A law was introduced in 2000 recognising prostitution as a legal profession in an effort to reduce crime and protect prostitutes.

The authorities try to regulate prostitution, aiming at protecting minors, eliminating forced prostitution and combating the new phenomena of human trafficking. Any sex business must obtain from a municipality a license, certifying that it has fulfilled the legal requirements to operate.

While I am all for protecting women, I do believe this is another case of trying to manage a problem instead of dealing with it. Just last year, Amsterdam made a decision to close down 30% of the brothels because they were attracting crime and money-laundering to the area. One thing we should know by now: sin management never really works towards a solution. It just tidies up the outside so that we are not as repulsed by our evil and selfish hearts. All too soon, just like trying to stop a leak in a corroded sewer pipe with a little caulking, the filth will find another way to surface.

As to the answer to the big "why," Jesus gives a good one in John 9 when his followers ask who sinned to cause a man to be born blind.

You're asking the wrong question. You're looking for someone to blame. There is no such cause-effect here. Look instead for what God can do. - from John 9, The Message

In the middle of the brokenness of this world that I daily contribute to by my lack of wholeness, may I look for what God can do. What we really need is for Him to rescue us.


This is a picture of some lights (red and other colours) from the skyline of Montreal.

Comments

Shelley said…
I heard a woman on CBC radio talking about prostitution and this whole discussion about legalizing it. She was a cop who used to work undercover on the street to catch pimps. She said something like "how can we talk about legalizing prostitution? Prostitution is abuse of women, plain and simple. No little girl dreams of being a prostitute when she grows up."

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