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inbetween places

We spent a few hours looking for a home again today. Nothing seems quite right - either they are in a bad location or too small or too much money or there is no parking or they already have an offer on them or they need a lot of work. Sigh. I love change and I get all excited about moving, but that slippery in-between time when I don't know where we will land and I just hope no one will break a leg when we do...well, let's just say I sometimes lose sight of the long term and become less than the incredibly fun and positive and faith-filled person that Matte can be.

Here are 2 exercises that have shored up my hope and helped keep the meltdowns to a minimum this past week or two.

1. I fast from the house search. Yesterday I did not research any properties nor think about houses at all. It is an exercise that plainly says to my soul, "Your effort is not the biggest factor in this equation. God is your provider. Period." Oh, and one is not allowed to fret or worry about the future on fast days as well. I am only allowed to celebrate all the good things in my life right now!

2. I regularly read the Biblical handbook on real estate, Jeremiah. Really, who knew there was so much good stuff about things breaking and being restored and buying property and moving and not worrying about it all in this book? Here are a few samples:

Make yourselves at home there and work for the country's welfare. If things go well for Babylon (insert your adopted place of residence here), things will go well for you. -Jeremiah 29

I know what I'm doing. I have it all planned out - plans to take care of you, not abandon you, plans to give you the future you hope for. -Jeremiah 29

Look. The time is coming when I will turn everything around for my people, both Israel and Judah. I, God, say so. I'll bring them back to the land I gave their ancestors and they'll take up ownership again. -Jeremiah 30

I've never quit loving you and never will. Expect love, love and more love! And so now I'll start over with you and build you up'll go back to your old work of planting vineyards...and sit back and enjoy the fruit. -Jeremiah 31

Set up signposts to mark your trip home. Get a good map. study the road conditions. The road out is the road back. -Jeremiah 31

So I bought the field at Anathoth from my cousin Hanamel. I paid him seventeen silver shekels. I followed all the proper procedures: in the presence of witnesses I wrote out the bill of sale, sealed, it, weighed out the money on the scales...Life is going to return to normal. Homes and fields and vineyards are again going to be bought in this country. -Jeremiah 32

Stay alert! I am God, the God of everything living. Is there anything I can't do? -Jeremiah 32

Yes, people will buy farms again, and legally, with deeds of purchase, sealed documents, proper witnesses... I will restore everything that was lost. -Jeremiah 32

But now take another look. I'm going to give this city a thorough renovation, working a true healing inside and out. I'm going to show them life whole, life brimming with blessings. I'll restore everything that was lost...I'll build everything back as good as new. -Jeremiah 33

The motto for this city will be, "God has set things right for us." -Jeremiah 33

Look, the whole land stretches out before you. Do what you like. Go and live wherever you wish. Jeremiah...made his home with...the people who were left behind in the land. -Jeremiah 40

If you are ready to stick it out in this land, I will build you up and not drag you down, I will plant you and not pull you up like a weed....Your fears are for nothing. I'm on your side, ready to save and deliver you from anything he (king of Babylon) might do. I'll pour mercy on you. What's more, he will show you mercy! -Jeremiah 42

This is a photo I took on the ferry, travelling between Hudson and Oka.


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