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sprout

I just finished my last exam this morning. Well, let me qualify that: my last exam which completed my qualifying year for the MA in Theological Studies program. Beginning in September, I will be a full-fledged Masters student. I also have one final project to complete for my online worship course (stay tuned, it should be posted here in a few days) and then...I don't know. Perhaps I will read a book or go outside for a walk or do something crazy like watch television. Anything could happen.

This in-between time, when one thing is coming to a close and new things are on the horizon is exciting and fragile. Like the green sprouts outside my front door, this transition phase needs careful tending in order to grow into something big and strong and beautiful. I am still learning to do this well. Too often I start something and then neglect it when I get distracted or busy. Or I jump ahead in the game and try to use a skill before I have taken the time to really learn the basics well. Sometimes I require something from a friend that they are not ready nor equipped to give.

The sprout stage, when you start to see what something might become, is special. You cannot push it. You cannot hurry it along and tug at the flower to come out of the bud before it is ready to emerge. You cannot urge the apple to turn red and sweet before the peak of its growing season. You have to wait for the process to do what it does. Wounds heal, flowers bloom, brains learn, bodies rest, fruit ripens, trees grow, and time measures all these things out in wonderful precision so that they are natural and wondrous instead of jarring and harshly executed.

Let me enjoy this time and in four months find myself well-rested, well-traveled, well-invested in important relationships and tasks, more devoted to God, more responsive to love, less worried and stressed, less jealous and bitter about disappointments, more willing to be taught, and more equipped to lead and teach.

This is my in-between prayer and these are the sprouts just steps away from my front door.

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