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thoughts on my birthday

Yesterday was my birthday. My 50th birthday. Some people think that's a big deal. To me, it is just a number that states how many days I have had the privilege of waking up and getting out of bed to explore life. And that thought causes my heart to become full and expand with a whole lot of thankfulness and awe at life itself. Yes, indeed. These were some thoughts I had yesterday:

I get to open my eyes every morning and see sunlight. Some days it is full-on, unclouded, make-your-eyes-hurt, kind of sunshine that greets me. Other days it is misty, rainy, curtained light, but it is always light. And I am blessed to see it every day.

I get to wake up next to a warm, cuddly, funny, wise, generous, and faithful man every day. He often stares at me with adoring eyes, and takes me on dates pretty much every week. He can fix almost anything electronic and always knows where we parked. He can keep a steady beat no matter how eratic and chaotic the sounds are around him. I am blessed to have such a hug-able rock in my life.

I get to go to university and enlarge my mind and my heart. I read things that challenge me and make me think about why I do the things I do. I meet people that are walking much different paths than I am, and get to walk together with them for a bit. I am student and teacher and child and mentor all at the same time. I am blessed to be in a learning environment every day.

I love our condo and being in it every day. I love its vaulted ceilings and all its stairs. My legs go up and down hundreds of steps every day, without hesitation. I love to chase the cat around the house, scoop her up in my arms, and laugh over her silly antics. I love to open my fridge and see a great big jug of orange juice. I love stumbling down the stairs in the morning and having that first, thirst-quenching draught of orange, pulpy goodness. I love to stand on my balcony and see the planes fly overhead. I love to listen to the sound of my neighbourhood. I love to study in silence and burst into spontaneous little songs of joy that make no sense to anyone but me. I love the bus drivers who drive past my condo and make it possible for me to get around Montreal without a car.

I love the nearness of Friend and Father. Sometimes I have felt the lack of both, since my father died when I was in my early 20's and friends come and go in our transient world. But there is one Friend who is always available to hang out. And there is a Father who is always looking out for my best interests when I am too naive or stupid or stubborn to make the right decision.

I love today. It is built on a lot of yesterdays that were all good in their own way, but nothing compares to today. It is special. It invites me to come and romp around in it with all my might. It welcomes me to rest and savour and enjoy the moment in a spirit of gratitude. It declares that God's goodness is written all over my life, whether I recognise it or not. It shines!
May I shine every day, too!
These were some vegetables at the St-Norbert market at the end of August. Brilliant!

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