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We cancelled our cable television just over a month ago. The idea was that after we returned from our vacation, we would sign up with another provider who was offering a deal on satellite tv that included a free PVR. That hasn't happened. The truth is, we don't really miss it that much.

The only times I miss watching TV is when I do my ironing. A home improvement show always made an unpleasant chore much more bearable and helped the time pass quickly. For a few weeks, I ironed in silence, facing the silent, dark TV screen. Not that great. Then I decided to watch a DVD while I did my weekly ironing. Six shirts and three pants were not really enough to get into a movie, so that idea kind of bombed. Last week, I tried something new. I set up the ironing board in the guest room, opened up the curtains, and did all my ironing in front of the patio doors which overlook our neighbourhood.

While I ironed, I watched the sky, which is always changing this time of year. It started out bright blue with a few white wisps, then turned gray with what looked like rain clouds. I saw wind bending the trees in the park. Children played in the street. A boy rode by on his skateboard. Birds flew in and out of the scene, and the sun slowly pushed the shadows further and further away from me. As I ironed, I became part of this world of wonder.

The other time I used to watch TV was after coming home from a long day at school or after sitting at my desk for many hours studying. Too tired to tackle any more homework, I needed to give my brain a bit of a rest. It used to be reality TV that provided this break. When I walked in the door after school today, I pulled a bowl of watermelon out of the fridge, opened the curtains, and watched the changing sky as I sat on the guest bed and ate. The cat joined me in this moment of silent regard and relaxation.

Instead of reality TV, I now watch reality. Instead of being amused by clever scripts and camera-work, I now admire the natural, uncensored, untamed world outside my window. It rejuvenates my brain in ways that TV never did. It provides amusement, rest for a study-weary mind, and inspiration. It draws me into companionship with my world instead of isolating me in front of my personal screen. It is free and there is never any interruption in service. Though the storyline might be hard for some to follow, there is always something for the attentive viewer to enjoy and learn.

Windows versus cable TV. No contest.

This was a rainbow that I captured on my camera phone while Dean was driving on a rainy day in Winnipeg, Manitoba. That would be my hand that was tilting, not the houses.


Lori said…
I grew up without cable so I never really missed it, anytime I've in a hotel room with cable I (more often than not) go through all the channels without finding anything to watch and the TV stays off. Due to lack of timeI usually end up watching movies in half hour segments anyway. Most of the time I've got the rdio or a CD on....if I had the $ I would probably getsatellite radio and a nice sound system before I got a TV.

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