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run fast

sooo I used to be a filmaker. no, seriously, it's true! Here are some of the titles I worked on that did not get nominated for any awards but certainly merited consideration, in my opinion:

1. How To Replace a Windshield in Your Motorhome

2. Who Says You Can't Take It With You (30 second promo on how you need a motorhome if you are an outdoorsy guy or at least dressed like one)

3. Great Trek 3 (some youth retreat in Banff...this actually aired on local television)

4. President's Message (um, not president of the USA or any other country, but of the local manufacturer I worked for. I managed to set the shot up so it looked like he was hiding behind a tree, unintentionally of course.)

5. Mercy Street (music video starring one of my favourite friends and stellar artist, Dan. Included fake blood and all. Don't worry, we washed it out of the alleyway as much as we could.)

Well, as you can see by the video above, I am back in business, home alone and without proper supervision. One of my friends pointed me to a few youtube videos and challenged me to do something in this genre again. I am not a practiced comedienne like her example, nor can I rival the profound, spiritual musings of my buddies Shane and Dave on the fakenaked blog show (http://www.nakedpastor.com/ and http://www.fakerepublic.com/), but at the end of a trying and disappointing week, I found great joy in being silly and totally matte-like and creating something for the sheer fun of it.

And those moments when I run fast in my creative soul, I feel His pleasure (apologies to Eric Liddell for plagiarizing horribly his wonderful line heard in the movie Chariots of Fire: "I believe God made me for a purpose, but he also made me fast. And when I run I feel His pleasure.")

Run fast in something today. Feel His pleasure.

Comments

shane magee said…
this is hilarious matte!!

i love the eric liddle reference. i use this quote a lot (like here: http://tinyurl.com/yv2sc3) and think it's pretty sad that he actually went to china as a missionary when running was so obviously his great gifting and passion.

all that being said, you're still hilarious!!
Anonymous said…
All the Tilmas are applauding .... and laughing without restraint ....

Yahoo!!!!!
steven hamilton said…
o that is great...hilarious

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