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fall back (trying not to)


Spring ahead, fall back (the nifty phrase used to remember what to do during daylight saving time.) It is just past 5 pm and already dark dark dark! That's what messing with the time zone does (thank you, daylight saving time inventor Benjamin Franklin). Although popular in North America and Europe, most of the world does not adhere to this ritual. Interesting.


Phew! I helped someone move this weekend and though very exhilarating, it was exhausting as well. Change always requires a good amount of energy (unlike stasis which requires very little) and sometimes we are tempted to forgo the evolution of our lives just for a moment in order to rest for a bit, let things go by for a bit. Whenever I feel that sort of passivity creeping into my soul, I know it is a dangerous thing. Comfort cannot be my motivation - EVER! Rest is a good and godly thing, but it comes from trusting God in all circumstances instead of relying on my own efforts, not from saying 'no' to forward motion. Here are a few things related to 'change' that I came across today:

1. sta·sis (stss, stss)
n. pl. sta·ses (stsz, stsz)
Stoppage of the normal flow of a body substance, as of blood through an artery or of intestinal contents through the bowels. [You see, stopping the normal flow of things is hindering life a.k.a death!]


2. from an article by Rick Joyner: As a general principle, the easier something is to attain, or the quicker, the more insignificant it is. If we really want a significant ministry, it will not likely happen fast or easily. That's why we are told to emulate those who through faith and patience inherited the promises. The more significant the ministry, the more faith and patience it will likely take to attain it. It is for this reason that most people, even very gifted people, usually live lives of frustration and regret because they only wanted to do the fun part, often considering themselves above the hard work required to actually bear fruit. These are the ones who may shine brightly for a moment, but then quickly flame out like a meteorite. They simply do not have the substance, the depth of character, knowledge, wisdom, and devotion to work hard to keep the fire burning for long.


3. from Rob Bell's book, Sex God: God's intent in creating these people [Adam and Eve] was for them to continue the work of creating the world, moving it away from chaos and wild and waste and formlessness toward order and harmony and good. As human beings, we take part through our actions in the ongoing creation of the world. The question is, What kind of world are we going to make? What kind of world will our energies create? We will take it somewhere. The question is, Where?


This is a January night sky taken while standing on the ice of Baie Vaudreuil early early this year.

Comments

Shelley said…
I am reading Becoming Human by Jean Vanier. He talks about having security in our lives so that we can live in the insecurity of pushing out our boundaries, learning and growing and facing new challenges in order to be fully alive. If we have too much security we will stagnate, if we don't have enough we will not be able to live insecurely, in a healthy way. much as you are saying here.

It is a balancing act, becuase if I get too 'out there' and my insecurity begins to be bigger than my security, I retreat.

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