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new friend

Dear Mr. 2010:

I haven't really spent a lot of time with you yet, but I already like you.

Even though it's only been a few days, you have shown me incredible highs and exhausting lows.

I like someone with good range.

I want to make sure that I take the time to sit and stare at you at different moments, drinking in your cute button nose with so much potential for beauty and sensitivity, and appreciating your deepening lines of experience.

I won't make a big deal about your age, I promise, but will be grateful for every day as it comes to me, arms open wide to embrace its soft graces or its prickly challenges.

I will try not to complain nor compare one day to another, because all days are food to my soul: some are broccoli, some are chocolate, and some are bitter but helpful medicine.

I will try to never speak badly of your predecessors, for they were just writing the story that we gave them.

It would be great if we could always be in sync and never irritated with each other, but perhaps that's a bit too much to ask from a budding new friendship. Perhaps we should get matching outfits that remind us that we are more alike than different, and will always be playing on the same side.

I am going to rely on you to get me past some rough spots, helping me heal from various ailments of the body, mind, and emotions.

And perhaps I can make sure you get lots of really good memories, and I can cover you with loads of footprints all heading in the right direction.

Oh, I see you have a roller coaster that is sure to provide some thrills.

And you also have a bank where you manage my investments.

If I can ask one favour of you: could we stay away from treadmills? I don't like going through the motions of running and then finding that I ended up no further along. Let's stick to real roads, even if they are a bit more unpredictable.

And let's make sure that we have lots of really cool conversations, okay?

And enjoy all the scenery, no matter how dark, hot, cold, or foggy it gets.

I don't want to miss a thing, so I had better make sure I get plenty of rest as well.

Thanks, Mr. 2010, for introducing yourself to me.

I look forward to a mutually beneficial friendship.

Can I call you '10 for short?
This is the scene from the plane last night when I landed in Montreal.

Comments

Anonymous said…
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