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present

Yesterday was my birthday. It was a good day - busy, but good. I spent 7 hours in class, 2 hours commuting, 1 hour in a meeting, 1.5 hours on administrative work for the church, just under 1 hour on errands to the bank and post office and such, and then had a lovely Mexican meal at the end of the day with the attentive Dean.

During my walk from the metro to my morning French class, I usually talk to God. And yesterday I was telling him what a great day it was to be alive and well and surrounded by good friends and family and the opportunities to learn. And then I wondered if it was okay to ask him for something for my birthday. Oh yes, I immediately knew that the good and giving God that I serve and love wanted me to ask for something special on a special day. But what? I have a hard time asking for things, especially from God, because it seems so self-centred and points all attention to me, but I really did want something amazing to mark the day that I took my first breath on this earth.

So I started to think and soon the thoughts and words were pouring out of my mind and heart and I could not see very clearly because my eyes were misting over and not just because of the wind. I asked for the gift of moving forward, of that gentle nudge or push that would take lives one step closer to where we are going and who we want to be. I asked for obstacles to be removed that keep us stuck; I asked for windows and doors to be thrown open and the time to be now for pages to turn and new chapters to begin. I asked for fruit and growth to come out of years of hard work and sowing seeds. I asked for perseverance to be rewarded by results. I asked that September 23 would be marked in the lives of myself and those whom I love and care about as the day that things shifted, and we saw movement forward and upward and outward in a significant way. I asked that hope would become reality and the light would shine forth on a new day. And not because of our hard work or amazing abilities, but simply because I asked and God likes us.

I hope you enjoyed my birthday, too. Tell me if something changed in your world.

This is the earth in Haskett, Manitoba, where I grew up.

Comments

One of Freedom said…
Happy Birthday Matte!!!!

Chelsea puked all over the backseat of my car, does that count. ;-) It certainly moved my world! I was really happy though at how calmly I responded, it was potentially a frustrating event because I had so many things on the go. But God was gracious and so where Sharon's co-workers.

I ended my day sitting with the primate of the North American Old Catholic Church (one of those orthodox churches of questionable origin) talking theology with an old guy who has loved Jesus a long, long time.
Shelley said…
Happy Birthday Matte! A hearty Amen to your prayer...I LOVE that God is an 'ask me' God...I'll keep you posted. :)

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