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Ode to d.e.a.n.

Today I had lunch with someone that I am just starting to get to know in my French class, and in the course of telling each other a bit about our lives, I mentioned some things about my husband, Dean. Her response was, “Wow, he sounds great. I hope I find someone like him.” (yeah, she is young and single). To which I replied, “Yes, everyone should have a Dean!” And that got me thinking about all the things that make Dean so great. Here are a few:

- someone who knows when to take you seriously (weeping uncontrollably when things disappoint me) and when to laugh at you (weeping uncontrollably when I read a book)
- someone who never leaves one doubt in your mind that he will always be faithful, and tells you so
- someone who thinks you are the most gorgeous babe around even when you show him your wrinkles (he thinks they’re cute)
- someone who will stand up for you when others say mean things
- someone who will always tell you the truth – “that is a hideous colour on you”
- someone who never hesitates to give you what is in his power to give
- someone who calls you everyday even if there is nothing important to talk about
- someone who is fun to hang out with – “let’s drive to Chicago for pizza – its only 16 hours!”
- someone who likes to play and laugh
- someone who enjoys your company and listens to you, even when you don’t make sense
- someone who calls you from his hotel on a business trip and wishes he were at home with you instead
- someone who knows you well enough to make you totally comfortable, never ashamed or embarrassed
- someone who delights in your quirks and encourages you to take risks (even shaving your head)
- someone you can disagree with and know he will respect your opinion
- someone who loves to sit back and see you try something new…and succeed!
- someone who accepts your shortcomings and mistakes with grace (and tries to help you get better)
- someone who is consistent yet can always surprise you
- (Dean just called and when I told him I was writing something about him, he asked if it was called “How Does Someone Get That Good-Looking?”) so make that…someone who doesn’t take himself too seriously, but has that perfect balance of confidence, humility, and a sense of humour
- someone who is musical and creative, always coming up with new ideas
- someone who loves words and knows how to use them
- someone who likes to sit close to you (there is no substitute for this!)
- and there’s more but I will stop here…

Never take the “Dean” for granted. Recognize the “Dean” in those around you. Be a “Dean” to someone.

Oh, in case you think Dean is perfect, never fear, he has some shortcomings: he doesn’t like carrots, he sometimes leaves his socks on the floor, and he has been known to play the radio too loud.

Comments

Anonymous said…
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Yreit said…
Your ode is a good reminder of how to periodically make a list of the ways we love someone. Keeps us from taking them for granted.
One of Freedom said…
You could sell Dean shares and make a fortune. Just kidding.
TObi said…
Ohhhhhhhhhhh.... so that's what he's like! I like seeing the Dean I know (have known for too little time) through the eyes of a close and tender observer. There's nothing more refreshing than hearing someone's best qualities, and hidden ones too, put into words to the litany of lovingkindness. Yay for Dean! Yay for Matte! Yay for praise!

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